Tuzk-e-Hind

mughalshit:


Taj Mahal
India (Agra), approx. 1860 - 1880
Albumen silver print

 The Taj Mahal, built between 1632 and 1643 under the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (reigned 1627– 1658) for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal, is one of the most photographed buildings in the world. Most visitors to India today try to include it in their itineraries. This was also true in the 1800s, but in that period few people had their own cameras, so nearly all tourists had to buy professional pictures from important photographic studios in India and elsewhere.  Photographer Francis Frith (British, 1822– 1898) never went to India himself, but he established an important firm that offered views from all over the world— including many photographs of Indian buildings and scenery— acquired from a large number of his contemporaries.This image shows an interesting view of the Taj Mahal. The earliest sketches and photographs were usually taken from the riverside because, as suggested by this photograph, the trees of the gardens were so tall they hid some of the structure. In order to allow for a view of the whole tomb with its four minarets, photographs were taken from high atop the gateway at the entrance to the gardens. It is far less common to find pictures from inside the garden; only an impression of the whole can be gotten from such an intimate view.

mughalshit:

Taj Mahal

India (Agra), approx. 1860 - 1880

Albumen silver print

The Taj Mahal, built between 1632 and 1643 under the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (reigned 1627– 1658) for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal, is one of the most photographed buildings in the world. Most visitors to India today try to include it in their itineraries. This was also true in the 1800s, but in that period few people had their own cameras, so nearly all tourists had to buy professional pictures from important photographic studios in India and elsewhere.  Photographer Francis Frith (British, 1822– 1898) never went to India himself, but he established an important firm that offered views from all over the world— including many photographs of Indian buildings and scenery— acquired from a large number of his contemporaries.

This image shows an interesting view of the Taj Mahal. The earliest sketches and photographs were usually taken from the riverside because, as suggested by this photograph, the trees of the gardens were so tall they hid some of the structure. In order to allow for a view of the whole tomb with its four minarets, photographs were taken from high atop the gateway at the entrance to the gardens. It is far less common to find pictures from inside the garden; only an impression of the whole can be gotten from such an intimate view.

(Source: searchcollection.asianart.org, via bhagyawati)

A map showing major lakes of Ladakh published in book, LADAKH , Physical, Statistical & Historical by Alexander Cunningham first published in 1853 AD, The lakes are Tsomorari,Kaiger Tso, Tsokhar and Pangkong Tso all situated in eastern Ladakh.

A map showing major lakes of Ladakh published in book, LADAKH , Physical, Statistical & Historical by Alexander Cunningham first published in 1853 AD, The lakes are Tsomorari,Kaiger Tso, Tsokhar and Pangkong Tso all situated in eastern Ladakh.

(Source: searchkashmir.org)

fishstickmonkey:

Photograph of the Mecca Masjid in Hyderabad, taken by Deen Dayal in the 1880s.
BL

fishstickmonkey:

Photograph of the Mecca Masjid in Hyderabad, taken by Deen Dayal in the 1880s.

BL

The Jami Masjid was erected in the fort at Gulbarga by Ala-ud-din Hasan Bahmani Shah (r.1347-1358), founder of the Bahmani dynasty. An inscription records that it was completed in 1367 but aspects of the ornament suggest it was completed in the early 15th century during the reign of Firuz Shah (r.1397-1422). Its plan resembles the Great Mosque of Córdoba in Spain. The mosque is unusual as the central area, which would normally have been an open courtyard, is covered over with numerous small domes. Three of the outer walls are not solid but made up of open arcades. The main sanctuary is crowned with a high dome above a square clerestory.

The mosque has no open courtyard. The outer passageways surround the prayer hall on three sides and have low open arcades with arches. They form a rectangular layout with ten bays each on the north and the south, and seven bays on the east. The square bays on the corners are topped by domes. The roofed interior bays are covered with low domes, faceted by pendentives. The front yard in front of the mihrab has nine bays with a single large dome. Trefoil interiors and elongated lobes are seen on sloping arches of the drum. The main roof drum is mounted on a cubic clerestory. The wooden screens that existed on the outer arcade openings have been removed over the years. They have been replaced, in recent times, by an arched entrance portal on the north face. On the whole, the mosque displays distinct Persian architectural style with five large domes (One large and four small at the corners) and 75 small domes with 250 arches.
(Wikipedia and British Library)

(Source: oldindianphotos.in)

magictransistor:

Series of Dutch engravings on the topic of the Mughal Emperors;

An audience with the Great Mogol, from an account of the travels of William Hawkins, by Pieter van der Aa, Leiden, 1706.

'La cour du Grand Mogol a Lahor' and 'Cour et pompe du Grand Mogol' at Agra , two views by van der Aa, from 'La Galerie Agreable du Monde (…).Tome premier des Indes Orientales.', published by P. van der Aa, Leyden, c. 1725.

Pomp and Ceremony of the March of the Great Mogol, from the ‘Atlas Historique’ by Chatelain, 1705-20.

A view from the ‘Atlas Historique…’ by Zacharie Chatelain, Amsterdam, 1732 (first ed. 1705-20).

[Magic Transistor]

(Source: columbia.edu)

magictransistor:

Mughal emperors depicted in Zacharie Chatelain’s ‘Atlas Historique’, Amsterdam, c. 1732.

(Source: columbia.edu)

Jodhpur Fort (Mehrangarh Fort) - 1890

Water-colour drawing by G.F. Lamb of the east view of the Jodhpur Fort in Rajasthan, dated c.1890. Inscribed on the front in ink: ‘G.F.L.’.

The formidable Meherangarh Fort, considered the finest in Rajasthan, was built by Rao Jodha (r.1458-89) of the Rathor Rajputs after he founded the city of Jodhpur. It stands on an isolated outcrop of rock which rises abruptly from the surrounding plain on the edge of the Thar Desert. Its high sheer walls and massive bastions dominate the city and can be seen for miles around. Within the fort at the northern end are the Old Palaces, a series of beautiful courtyard buildings, which date from the 17th century onwards. The fortified area stands to the south with a long wide terrace to the east. The palace of the maharajas is approached by a steep path along the east side of the cliff which passes through seven arched gateways. The royal complex consists of a series of apartments disposed around courtyards. The facades are distinguished by the extensive use of jalis, perforated stone screens carved with intricate patterns.

Copyright © The British Library Board

Source: Rare Book Society