Tuzk-e-Hind

Then and Now:
Unknown building at Panjim church square, Goa.
Old Photograph: Ar. Ketak Nachinolkar
New Photograph: Author, 2014

Then and Now:

Unknown building at Panjim church square, Goa.

Old Photograph: Ar. Ketak Nachinolkar

New Photograph: Author, 2014

Then and Now:

Casa Dempo, Panjim (red building to the left)

Casa Dempo, built c. 1850, is located in the heart of Panjim. It was the first home of the Dempo family when they moved to Panjim. The Dempos are among the oldest of the Goan Saraswat Brahmin clans. Built in classic Goan style, the interior layout features traditional Goan Hindu elements such as a raj aangan.

Casa Dempo also has an uplifting past. For several decades, the Dempos have thrown open its premises to thousands during lunchtime and served free vegetarian food – annachhatra, as this old Hindu practice is called. In particular, generations of needy students of all religions and castes have benefited from this largesse of the Dempo family.

Sources:

Text: http://www.parrikar.com/blog/2010/02/18/panjim-promenade-2/

Image 1: http://www.parrikar.com/blog/2010/02/18/panjim-promenade-2/

Old Photograph (Image 2): Ar. Ketak Nachinolkar

Present Day Photograph (Image 3): Author, 2014

Then and Now:
The northern gate of Purana Quila (Old Fort, Delhi), built in 1543–44, is called the Talaqi-Darwaza for reasons unknown. On this gate, in the front, carved marble leogryphs in combat with a man are seen above the oriel windows. Built in random rubble masonry with dressed stone facing, the gate has a tall arch enclosed by two smaller arched openings. Two bastions adorn the gate with high ceiling rooms. On the second floor of the gate, there are two openings. Exterior surface of the gate had colored tiles and the inner rooms were covered with incised plaster work.

Then and Now:

The northern gate of Purana Quila (Old Fort, Delhi), built in 1543–44, is called the Talaqi-Darwaza for reasons unknown. On this gate, in the front, carved marble leogryphs in combat with a man are seen above the oriel windows. Built in random rubble masonry with dressed stone facing, the gate has a tall arch enclosed by two smaller arched openings. Two bastions adorn the gate with high ceiling rooms. On the second floor of the gate, there are two openings. Exterior surface of the gate had colored tiles and the inner rooms were covered with incised plaster work.

New Delhi:

Concept sketches and construction photographs

(Source: scroll.in)

Then and Now:

A distant view of the Jami Masjid, Delhi, taken by Samuel Bourne in the 1860s. The Jami Masjid was the principal mosque of Shah Jahan’s new capital city Shahjahanabad. This is the largest mosque in India, it was the last great architectural venture of Emperor Shah Jahan (r.1628-58), the most prolific builder of the Mughal dynasty. It took six years to build and functioned as a congregational mosque which could hold 250,000 people. Approached via broad flights of steps its three gateways lead into a huge courtyard with a central tank for ritual ablutions. The mosque is built of red sandstone with white marble. The main building is topped by three onion-shaped domes of white marble striated with thin strips of black marble, and is flanked by two minarets, 130 ft high.

Below the photograph, is the water color painting of the same view by William Capenter. William Carpenter (1818–1899) was a watercolour artist. He travelled for six or seven years in the 1850s painting scenes of India, its people and its life. The Victoria and Albert Museum bought over 280 of his paintings. In 1856 he painted Prince Fakhr-ud Din Mirza, the eldest son of Bahadur Shah II, the last King of Delhi, five months before the Prince died.

The painting was made in the August of 1852. Today, it is impossible to view the Jama Masjid from the same angle.

Sources:

Old Photograph: www.oldindianphotos.in

William Carpenters Painting: commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:William_Carpenter_(painter)

Dear followers,

A few weeks back a photograph of the Gaffar Market was taken from the highly informative and reputed blog called the Indian Memory Project. The photograph was not meant to be shared. The admins of this blog apologize to the people concerned. The content has been removed. This will not happen in the future.

Regards.

The single-domed Qila-i-Kuna Mosque, built by Sher Shah in 1541 is an excellent example of a pre-Mughal design, and an early example of the extensive use of the pointed arch in the region as seen in its five doorways with the ’true’ horseshoe-shaped arches. It was designed as a Jami Mosque, or Friday mosque for the Sultan and his courtiers. The prayer hall inside, the single-aisled mosque, measures 51.20m by 14.90m and has five elegant arched prayer niches or mihrabs set in its western wall. Marble in shades of red, white and slate is used for the calligraphic inscriptions on the central Iwan, marks a transition from Lodhi to Mughal architecture. At one time, the courtyard had a shallow tank, with a fountain.

A second storey, accessed through staircases from the prayer hall, with a narrow passage running along the rectangular hall, provided space for female courtiers to pray, while the arched doorway on the left wall, framed by ornate jharokas, was reserved for members of the royal family. On a marble slab within the mosque an inscription reads: ”As long as there are people on the earth, may this edifice be frequented and people be happy and cheerful in it”. Today it is the best preserved building in Purana Qila.

Sources:

Old Photographs: www.columbia.edu

New Photographs: Clicked by Author, 2013

Text: Wikipedia

Sher Shah gate located to the south of Khairu’l-Manazil-Masjid is said to be an entrance to the large city of Delhi that Sher Shah built in front of his fortress of Purana Qila. The gate, mostly built with red sandstone but with use of local grey quartzite in its upper storey, is thus called the Lal Darwaza (red gate). Arcades were built from this gate into the city, which were provided with series of dwellings with frontage of a verandah, which may have been used for commercial establishments. Kabuli or Khuni–Darwaza (explained in the following section) is another gate on the fringes of Sher Shah’s city. ASI has undertaken extensive conservation works of the gate and its surroundings at a cost of Rs7.5 million (US$150,000).

Sepia Photograph: April, 2011 (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Moti_Gate_of_Sher_Shah_Suri_5.jpg#file)

Present Day Photography: June 2013, Clicked by Author

(Source: Wikipedia)

Sunderwala Burj, before and after Conservation by Aga Khan Trust for Culture. Inappropriate repair works through the 20th century have reduced many of our important monuments to a caricature of their formal self / as the original builders intended them to be. For more information, please visit, Nizamuddin Urban Renewal Project.

Taken from Nizamuddin Basti Urban Renewal Initiative Facebook page.

(Source: facebook.com)